Week 2 Queries

This forum is for queries and related discussions with respect to the Sanskrit Webinar Class conducted by Dr Varun.

Pronunciation

Postby branganathan » Wed Feb 15, 2017 11:13 pm

The pronunciation of the Anuswara to go to the 5th letter corresponding to the letter following the anuswara was very clear. Sometimes there is an anuswara and the following letter is a "s" (स्). The example for this is कामांस्तु. What is the right way to say this?
branganathan
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Wed Feb 15, 2017 11:04 pm

DON’T MARK ‘NO’ IF THE ABSENCE IS DUE TO ANY TECHNICALITY

Postby enJeffrey2 » Thu Feb 16, 2017 5:13 am

So its required that the entry is minimum a purple dot, right?
No entry if the other confirmations are present, but no purple dot?
User avatar
enJeffrey2
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Tue Feb 14, 2017 4:20 am

Re: Week 2 Queries

Postby shankar1800 » Thu Feb 16, 2017 7:31 am

Hari OM Dr. Varun ji,

Wonderful webinar! Thoroughly enjoying it.

? on Visargah. You mentioned that the Visargah being a release of breath, takes the "shape" of the Swara that precedes it. Does that mean that the Visarga following a Dirgha swara is pronounced longer than a hrasva?

Specifically interested in the chanting difference between a Visargah appearing in the middle and one that appears after the eighth syllable in a verse such as,

BG Ch XV, Verse 14, second line : pushNAmi caushadhIh sarvAh

Thanks in advance for the clarification.

With Regards
Shankar
shankar1800
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Sun Feb 12, 2017 10:48 am

Re: 'THE SANSKRIT ALPHABET - PART-2'

Postby DOCTOR » Thu Feb 16, 2017 10:56 am

Dear Dr. Varun Khanna,

Namaste!

At the outset, I thank you for welcoming my ‘write-ups’ after each of your Lessons of the on-going Sanskrit Webinar!

I am also highly thankful to you for going through my write-ups and giving necessary suggestions and corrections therein!!

In this connection, I may mention that only with a view to help the Participants of this Sanskrit Webinar, I got an idea of penning these write-ups. And, I have been writing the same based on my Linguistic Background and other observations.

Further, I ensure you that would restrict my write-ups only to your Lessons of each of the weeks to the extend possible and feasible.

I have since modified my Paper in question on the basis of your suggestions and corrections and re-titled it as 'THE SANSKRIT ALPHABET - PART-2--Modified' and uploaded the same to 'Uploads by Students' of the Google Drive.

Regards,
--Dr. Y.N. RAO,
02/16/2017
DOCTOR
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 12:43 am

Re: 'THE SANSKRIT ALPHABET - PART-2'

Postby DOCTOR » Thu Feb 16, 2017 11:00 am

Dear All,

Based on the suggestions and corrections made by our Guruji Dr. Varun Khanna, I have made necessary modifications in my Paper and re-titled it as 'THE SANSKRIT ALPHABET - PART-2--Modified' and uploaded the same to ‘Uploads by Students’ of the Google Drive.

You may go to the Google Drive and view or download the same from there.

With best wishes,
--Dr. Y.N. RAO,
02/16/2017
DOCTOR
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 12:43 am

Re: Week 2 Queries

Postby VarunKhanna » Thu Feb 16, 2017 11:03 am

aardra11 wrote:Question on upadhmaniyah: just to clarify, does it refer exclusively to the situation where a visarga is followed by the pa or pha sound? And if so, would an example of this be in Gayatri mantra, "nah prachodayat" where the visarga in nah would not need to be pronounced fully and it could be said faster / together as in the example given in the video, "kah pibati?"


Dear Aardra ji,

Hari Om!

Yes, everything you said is correct. The upadhmānīya refers exclusively to the situation of a visarga followed by p or ph. The example you mentioned is perfect; yes it can be said like how I pronounced kaḥ pibati in the class.

Good job!

Varun
VarunKhanna
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 9:08 am

Re: Week 2 Queries

Postby VarunKhanna » Thu Feb 16, 2017 11:31 am

shankar1800 wrote:? on Visargah. You mentioned that the Visargah being a release of breath, takes the "shape" of the Swara that precedes it. Does that mean that the Visarga following a Dirgha swara is pronounced longer than a hrasva?


Dear Shankar ji,

Hari Om!

Yes, the visarga is a release of the breath, and it does take the shape of the preceding svara. But the length of the visarga is the same -- just a short release at the end. So whether you say "ihi" or "iiiiiiiihi" the end will still be that short "hi". The visarga does not change its duration following a vowel, only its shape.

shankar1800 wrote:Specifically interested in the chanting difference between a Visargah appearing in the middle and one that appears after the eighth syllable in a verse such as,

BG Ch XV, Verse 14, second line : pushNAmi caushadhIh sarvAh


As for this case, when the visarga is followed by the letters "s", "ś", or "ṣ", it is actually pronounced as that following letter. So for this example, we find the pronunciation will be like this: "puṣṇāmi cauṣadhīs sarvāḥ"

And the visarga at the end will be the normal release of breath sound, in the shape of "a".

Hope this helps!

Varun
VarunKhanna
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 9:08 am

Re: Week 2 Queries

Postby viduram » Fri Feb 17, 2017 1:22 pm

Hari Ohm!
Is सम्पद same as संपद?
They seem to sound the same.
Thanks.
viduram
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2017 1:11 pm

Re: Week 2 Queries

Postby viduram » Fri Feb 17, 2017 1:56 pm

Hari Ohm,
Is is सम्पद same as संपद?
Thanks
viduram
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2017 1:11 pm

Re: Week 2 Queries

Postby kishori2017 » Fri Feb 17, 2017 8:40 pm

How is ृ considered a vowel if it has an “R” sound built into it? Same with the लृ?

If ृ is a vowel, why would one ever use the form रि in a word?

If ृ represents the first part of a combination that creates the semi-vowel र, then why would you ever use a half-R (कर्म) instead of ृ? Why would using कृ remove the अ vowel from the “k” sound and replace it with the “R” sound (which leads back to the question of how is this sound a vowel and not a consonant?) Why, for example, would you not use क्री to get to the “kri” sound instead of कृ?

If the anusvara represents the sound of the last consonant in a line of consonants (if पंप sounds like “pump” and संग sounds like “sang”, then why would you ever use the anusvara in Sanskrit instead of using the more specific form of पम्प and सङ्ग?
kishori2017
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:33 pm

Week 2 - Home Work

Postby jayarams » Sat Feb 18, 2017 10:40 pm

Hello Friends

Namaste.
I hope you are all having a great weekend..

I am attempting the home work and I guess, the last letters of the ka, cha, ta, tha, pa vargas. (I will try to get to find out a way to type sanskrit letters here..

Since they are nasal sounds (nasika) - I assume they should be called kanda nasika, thalu nasika, moordha nasika, dantha nasika and Oushta nasika.

Any comments welcome.

Lets talk a lot in the coming weeks..

See you all tomorrow.
Jay (Jayaraman)
jayarams
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2017 10:27 pm

Font to Download for Devanagari

Postby kbhaskaran » Sun Feb 19, 2017 9:02 am

Hari Om,

Can please guide what font to download and install on a Windows machine?
I am able to view BBC Hindi webpage ok (http://www.bbc.com/hindi), but some of the text in Notes for Week 2 appears as boxes (please see attached).

Many thanks for your assistance!
Attachments
Notes for Week2 - which Devanagari font to download.PNG
Some Devanagari font appears as boxes
kbhaskaran
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Sun Feb 05, 2017 5:11 pm

Re: Font to Download for Devanagari

Postby VarunKhanna » Sun Feb 19, 2017 5:45 pm

kbhaskaran wrote:Hari Om,

Can please guide what font to download and install on a Windows machine?
I am able to view BBC Hindi webpage ok (http://www.bbc.com/hindi), but some of the text in Notes for Week 2 appears as boxes (please see attached).

Many thanks for your assistance!


Dear kbhaskaran,

Hari om!

I am going to be uploading PDFs from now on of all the notes. Sorry for the inconvenience! In the meantime, for Windows, you can download all the Devanāgarī fonts from this website:

http://salrc.uchicago.edu/resources/fonts/available/sanskrit/

All the best!

Varun
VarunKhanna
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 9:08 am

Re: Week 2 Queries

Postby VarunKhanna » Sun Feb 19, 2017 6:41 pm

viduram wrote:Is सम्पद same as संपद?
They seem to sound the same.


Dear viduram,

Hari Om!

Yes, their pronunciation is the same. They are the same words, in fact, but we will get to how later.

All the best,

Varun
VarunKhanna
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 9:08 am

Week 1 and 2 documents

Postby vanand137 » Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:04 pm

Dear Sir,
Hari Om !
The week 1 and 2 documents and assignments are NOT available as shared folders in google drive for me. Request you to share these documents please.

Thank you

Anand
vanand137
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2017 7:40 pm

Re: Week 1 and 2 documents

Postby vanand137 » Sun Feb 19, 2017 8:24 pm

Thank you. I was able to locate them myself .
vanand137
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Sun Feb 19, 2017 7:40 pm

Re: DON’T MARK ‘NO’ IF THE ABSENCE IS DUE TO ANY TECHNICALITY!

Postby sdarisi » Mon Feb 20, 2017 1:52 am

I was not aware of 'attendance' until I ran across this thread. Thanks to Dr. Khannaji for the clarification that attendance is not something to worry about....and I mean that in the positive sense. Although I registered for the live session, I have not joined any of the three live sessions that have been held to date. However, I have reviewed all the three recordings on the following day.

Dr. Khannaji, thank you for your time and excellent work. Your interaction and approach makes this a fully pleasant and enjoyable experience. I have learnt a lot more than Sanskrit.

Appears to me that English, French, Spanish (three languages that I have familiarity with) are vocabulary/memory driven whereas Sanskrit is a more descriptive/visual language which is limited only by the speaker's ability to describe something and not necessarily the memorization of vocabulary. (Perhaps, an understanding of Latin may change my views on this. Just as you said, language is the lens to the world) This enables Sanskrit to be a language of the 'common man'. Your examples of 'aasandah' and 'paadapah' in the first session are a good example of this. These sessions have also helped me better understand and make some connections to words in Indian languages such as Telugu and Hindi. As I heard about the the 'murdha' pronunciation, I could not but make the leap to the Hindi word for a dead person and visualize the tongue's position for the dead person. Similarly, the difference between Kanthah and Kantham become clearer for me. Thank you again.
sdarisi
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Mon Feb 20, 2017 1:20 am

Re: Week 2 Queries

Postby VarunKhanna » Sat Feb 25, 2017 6:39 pm

kishori2017 wrote:How is ृ considered a vowel if it has an “R” sound built into it? Same with the लृ?


Dear kishori2017,

Hari Om!

Sorry for the delay in responding. ऋ and लृ are very special. They are considered vowels because they have a स्वर (vowel) component in them, but they also have a व्यञ्जन (consonant) component in them. So what makes them vowels? That vowel component.

kishori2017 wrote:If ृ is a vowel, why would one ever use the form रि in a word?


This is a good question. But it is coming because you have not understood the pronunciation difference between ऋ and रि. ऋ is itself a vowel, and is uniquely made in the मूर्धा; therefore, it does not include components of इ or उ, as some people pronounce it the same as रि or रु, respectively. This is incorrect. It is like pronouncing अ while your tongue is in the मूर्धा position. Try this. Do not let your lips go into इ or उ positions. Keep them in the position you would normally keep them when saying the letter अ. Now, keeping your tongue in the मूर्धा position, say अ. That is how you pronounce ऋ, and that is also why it is independent from रि or रु.

kishori2017 wrote:If ृ represents the first part of a combination that creates the semi-vowel र, then why would you ever use a half-R (कर्म) instead of ृ? Why would using कृ remove the अ vowel from the “k” sound and replace it with the “R” sound (which leads back to the question of how is this sound a vowel and not a consonant?) Why, for example, would you not use क्री to get to the “kri” sound instead of कृ?


Nice observation. Well, when we combine अ and ऋ, what we get is अर्. So you're on the right track. Two vowels cannot sit next to each other. They change each other in certain ways (this is called सन्धि). The second half of this question I have already answered above.

kishori2017 wrote:If the anusvara represents the sound of the last consonant in a line of consonants (if पंप sounds like “pump” and संग sounds like “sang”, then why would you ever use the anusvara in Sanskrit instead of using the more specific form of पम्प and सङ्ग?


You are 3 for 3 on good questions. The अनुस्वार is independent because some letters do not have a nasal equivalent, such as व, स, श, ष, and ह. If I was to replace the अनुस्वार in "संस्कृत" with a specific nasal letter, which one would it be? There is no perfect match. Although I subscribe to the view that we can get close with न्, because it is formed in the same place in the mouth, an equally valid view is that the अनुस्वार can be pronounced as म् optionally in this case, which is the sort of natural pronunciation of the अनुस्वार. This is a big and ongoing debate, and there are two equally valid sides. In my opinion, the pronunciation of the अनुस्वार in "संस्कृत" is something like न् but without a full touch. Like a sort of sibilant-y way of saying न्.

Hope this helps!

Varun
VarunKhanna
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 9:08 am

Re: Pronunciation

Postby VarunKhanna » Sat Feb 25, 2017 11:30 pm

Dear branganathan,

Hari Om!

Sorry for the delay. I have answered this query in the "Week 2 Queries" thread in my response to kishori2017. Please check there for the answer. If your question still isn't answered, please don't hesitate to get back to me!

All the best,

Varun
VarunKhanna
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Mon Feb 06, 2017 9:08 am

Re: Week 2 Queries

Postby kishori2017 » Sun Feb 26, 2017 10:55 am

Hari Om Varun JI, Thanks for your clarification for all the answers. You are wonderful teacher (Guru). This knowledge is totally new to me and I am trying to understand it. आप के समय के लिए बहुत बहुत धन्यवाद।
किशोरी
kishori2017
 
Posts: 0
Joined: Thu Feb 16, 2017 8:33 pm

Previous

Return to Sanskrit Webinar

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users